Google Wants Our Photos In The Cloud

image of a compact=Google currently has a deal going that offers a free Eye-Fi card when you lease 200GB of storage for them for a year. When I first saw it it seemed like a pretty good deal, and I hate to pass up a good deal. But it’s less of a deal if I don’t really need the space and won’t use the card. So that got me thinking about my options.

The space is split between Gmail and Picasa. I’m not even close to my Gmail limit and I’m not currently a Picasa user. In theory there’s also some unofficial hacks that allow the space to be used for file storage, like gDisk for the Mac. But I’m not willing to trust something Google may break at anytime so it’s not a consideration. What I’d be looking to use the disk for is to back up my photos. Right now I have just under 20GB of photos and it costs me less than $3/mth to keep them backed up offsite. So that’s $36/year, still shy of the $50.

But that assumes I could easily save everything up to Picasa and I found that wouldn’t be possible. The Picasa 3 desktop allows automatic syncing of it’s albums to albums on Picasa web albums. But this proved to be problematic and not a better solution than plain old backup via Jungle Disk. The deal-breakers were:

  • Picasa is limited to 1,000 albums with up to 1,000 photos in each album. This sounds like a lot but the 1,000 album limit is a deal breaker for me. I keep my files in a directory structure and the number of directories already exceed 1,000. I don’t want to do any drag or dropping to create new albums just for syncing since that’s prone to error. Sure, I have plenty of directories with one or two photos, but I don’t want to re-organize everything , I’m set in my ways.
  • Deleting entire albums from Picasa desktop did not delete the album from the web. Photos within albums deleted just fine. Deleting all pictures in a folder automatically deleted the folder so it’s not like I could keep the folder behind until it synced the deletions.
  • RAW image files were synced to the web as jpg’s so it wouldn’t be a true backup.

While a lot of people like Picasa, there was nothing that caught my attention and would compel me to use it. I’ll keep looking at it and may yet find some compelling feature, but for now I’d have a hard time justifying 200GB for Picasa. Realistically I’d be better off with a lower priced plan.

Then there’s the Eye-Fi card. If it was worth the cost then I could consider $50 for the card and the Google storage as the free product. The version offered is the Eye-Fi Home Video which has a list price of $69. I don’t find it online anywhere for a street price. The closest card is the Eye-Fi Share Video which sells for $73 at Amazon. If I had to guess I’d say the “catch” is that that since the Home Video card doesn’t typically include any online component the only online options are Picasa and YouTube. These are the only online services specifically mentioned in the offer. The Share Video allows sharing with more services. Other, more expensive, cards include geo tagging photos which would add a potentially useful feature.

I like the idea of being able to automatically load pictures from my camera to my PC automatically, but the Wi-Fi card doesn’t offer anything else that’s compelling to me.

So while the Google/Wi_fi offer does seem like a good deal I’m not yet convinced it’s worth $50 to me. I’m still intrigued by Picasa and the web album component so I’ll keep considering it.

I also decided to looks at some alternatives:

  • SmugMug offers online albums along with a “SmugVault” that can be used to store any type of file (such as RAW files) but it’s a subscription service and would cost more than what I have now.
  • The old standby Flickr is $25/yr for unlimited storage. Still, it’s not a good solution for backup. There are plenty off Flickr add-ins and plug-ins so I could probably find one to do syncing, but it still wouldn’t be a true backup.
  • I already use Windows Live Photo Gallery to organize my photos and like it. Plus there’s a free 25GB for online photo albums. But like the others, it’s lacking as a backup solution.

So, the bottom line is Jungle Disk remains the way I backup my photos. I’m really not surprised since it’s cheap and easy. Picasa still has my attention if I want to do some online albums and the Eye-Fi card would offer some convenience. But I’d probably want the version that does geo tagging (although I haven’t done any research to see how well it does that). I may spend the $50 bucks in a moment of weakness since it is a good deal, but for now I won’t be clicking the button to upgrade storage and order the card.